Posts in Parenting

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Autism Parent Nov. 2016

KultureCity is a great nonprofit based in Birmingham, Alabama that is changing the world into a better place for people with Autism. Read about them and their Love Without Words campaign. Parenting Hacks deals with saying, "no." Get some ideas about how to teach that concept with your child. Relax! looks at ways to free valuable brain space by journaling. In Resonate with Heart, I talk about my journaling experiences. Finally, check out the Events, Support Groups, and Sensory Friendly Films sections. Enjoy the issue!
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My Black Mom

Despite my blond-hair, blue-eyes, and a dad who is a white supremacist, I have a black mom. Charlotte Lee adopted me while I was in my thirties because I asked her to. She called me daughter and it healed a part of my heart that ached for someone who loved me, to fill that “mother” void in my soul.
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Dear Adult Kids

Dear Adult Kids, I will always love you no matter what. Of all the things that have exited my body, you are my favorite! I can't help being old. Stop making fun of me I am not your bank, but I am your friend. I will loan you money and you can count on me to help you move. You’re welcome for the awesome hair. Don’t get upset with me when I say you’re cute. You still remind me of that snot-nosed three year-old, who hugged me all the time and thought I was awesome. It’s not your job to validate my parenting success by looking or acting like a clone.
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A Better Time-Out

A Better Time-Out Time-Out is a great tool for parents to use with children. But, what if there is a better, more effective way to use Time-Out? To find out if this article will help you, answer yes or no to the following questions about how you use Time-Out. --- **Time-Out Quiz** * A child should be in time out one minute for every year of age. (Example: A 4 year-old would get 4 minutes of Time-Out.) * Time-Out must be in a chair or mat away from the activity. * Time-Out is effective 100% of the time
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Positive Parenting: Overteaching

Overteaching is a term in Applied Behavioral Analysis (ABA) that sounds like you are going to "drill for skill," like practicing Spelling words. However, overteaching is a great way to correct a behavior that needs to end. For instance, say your child just poured out their crackers on the floor and it was no accident. Maybe they were even staring you down a bit and challenging you to stop them. This is a great time to employ overteaching.
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Autism Parent Newsletter May 2016

The Issue at Hand May is second only to December when it comes to being busy! All the end of school activities, the holiday, the last minute things, it creates a flurry of busy-ness! Now, summer is here and it is time to change gears and have children home instead of at school. Putting together this month's issue, a heart theme began to emerge. Resonate with Heart describes the evolution of the Resonant Heart© logo and what it means to resonate. A parent shared a heart she designed in Parenting Post-Its. And, "A Heart-Centered Meditation" is described in Relax!, which will help you to take short breaks to de-stress. Parenting Hacks offers some ideas for summer activities. Events scheduled in the Wichita and Kansas City area are listed, including support groups, fund-raisers, and Sensory-friendly films. The feature article is exciting news about a program Ford is beginning that will hire individuals with ASD. Enjoy the issue! Sue Claridge
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One Day Grounding

When I was a foster mom, discipline techniques could be tricky. First of all, I would have a child that I didn’t know well. Part of having a successful relationship with a child is getting “buy-in” or making them feel like they were a part of this family, even if the word “foster” was in the mix. I avoided calling my kids “foster children” because that label has some unpleasant connotations. Even so, some behaviors albeit normal and expected, had to be dealt with. One of my kids had a serious problem with ADHD, and an appropriate grounding to fit the infraction might last a week or two. A few days into a two week grounding and I realized that the punishment was affecting me as much or more than the kid. Then, we both started forgetting why this horrible event was playing out. Appropriate or not, the consequence was ineffective.
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